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the latest material handling developments from Columbus McKinnon
Updated: 1 day 7 hours ago

Free Safety Webinars to Resume in January 2015

Fri, 12/12/2014 - 02:00

Each month, the Columbus McKinnon training team hosts a free online safety webinar. We will not be holding a webinar in December, but to keep you focused on safety during this holiday break, we had a little fun making a video featuring five important tips to get you through the season safely.

We hope to see you in January, when our monthly safety webinars return with
Hoist Chain Lubrication: Why is it so Important?Register now.

Need a stocking stuffer idea?
Order the complete set of Safety Webinars!
We’ve compiled all of our 2014 recorded webinars on one convenient USB thumb drive. As an added bonus, we have also included all of our 2013 Safety Webinars.

Order by Christmas and we’ll include a free CM Rigging Guide!

We would like to thank all of our past safety webinar attendees for their time and interest, with a special call out to our Safety All-Stars for 2014:

  • Standard Crane, the company who attended the most CMCO Safety Webinars
  • Patrick Cox of Westech Rigging Supply, the individual who attended the most CMCO Safety Webinars

Thanks for all of the great feedback we have received on our safety webinars this year. Stay tuned for more engaging content to help you work safer in 2015!

Chester Hoist Develops Hand Chain Hoist for Demanding Customer Application

Fri, 12/05/2014 - 00:00

Chester Hoist, a Columbus McKinnon brand, specializes in the design and manufacture of high-quality, custom-made hoists for unique and challenging applications. So, when our customer came to us with a special need for a hand chain hoist to raise and move large rolls, Chester Hoist was put to the task.

The customer had a long list of specific requirements that the hoist needed to meet. Requirements included:

  • 4-point pickup hand chain hoist with an incorporated hand geared trolley to run inside of 5” channels
  • Hook spacing that had to be 12” perpendicular to the runway and spaced to accommodate the 12” diameter roll parallel to the runway
  • 42” hand wheel extensions on the trolley and hoist mechanism
  • The ability to time all four hooks to raise simultaneously
  • Chain containers
  • 13” maximum headroom

To meet these requirements, our Chester Hoist engineering team started with a standard 4-plate low head and severely modified the unit. The real challenge the team faced was coming up with suitable hook spacing and to run the hooks in opposite directions with a single hoist mechanism.

The trolley and hoist hand wheels were mounted on a separate support trolley located 30.5” outside the hoist trolley channels.

Special gearing and sheave arrangements were added to the modified low-headroom hoist. Because of low operating height, the customer also required special guards over the gearing. The Chester team fabricated special shields to fit between the outboard and inboard side plates to guard the gearing arrangement.

To achieve the 13” headroom within the compact design, a special roller chain trolley drive was incorporated into the unit.

When the custom engineering was complete, the team provided the customer with a hoist that met all of their requirements and could be used to raise and move large rolls for their application.

Chester Hoist specializes in developing specially engineered products for unique applications ranging from low headroom manual hoists for military applications to spark-resistant hoist and trolley combinations for use on offshore oil platforms. Let us know how we can help you with your application!

 

Columbus McKinnon Associates Touching Lives One Charity at a Time

Thu, 11/27/2014 - 02:00

Thanksgiving is here and we have a lot to be thankful for. One of the best ways to show gratitude is to give back to our community by helping those less fortunate.

At Columbus McKinnon, volunteering and working with our local charities is very important to us. We know that many of you feel the same way and invest your time and resources in community service. We want to honor the charities that you support.

For the next six weeks, we would like you to share a photo with us of a community service event you did with your company or your family along with a link to the charity. Please send your photos to cmcolive@cmworks.com or you can post them on our Facebook page. We will create an album there and would love to have your event and charity included!

To kick things off, I would like to share three recent community outreach events within Columbus McKinnon and the charities we supported:

Ok, now its your turn. There are so many great causes out there deserving of our time and investment. Share your story! We can’t wait to hear about the difference you are making in your communities!

A Chain Sling Question from the Mining Industry

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 02:00

Here is a question from Adam, a mobile crane operator working in the mining industry, who regards proper rigging equipment and practices as a major safety priority:

“We have a 1-inch GR80 chain sling, 30 feet in length that is around ten years old and in good condition, although there is inner link wear throughout the sling at its bearing points. The narrowest measurement in link diameter at any point was .945″, which is well away from removal criteria. No components in the sling show any evidence of a stretch condition, and the sling has not been subjected to overload to the best of our knowledge, though I cannot guarantee that.

“The reach of the sling is approximately four inches longer than its tag indicates. According to my calculations, this stretch is due to the contact wear in each link. The chain moves freely and there is no binding or restriction of movement. Is this legitimate? If so, does the tag need to be replaced or modified to indicate its current length? Our inspections have always been completed by a company assigned employee.”

Response from Peter Cooke, training manager:

Thank you for reaching out to us. For your reference, I have included a section on alloy rigging chain inspection from our Columbus McKinnon rigging catalog here. Be sure to do a link-by-link inspection and follow the rejection criteria from OSHA 1910.184 and ASME B30.9. Be sure there are no stretched links. Reference the “Allowable Chain Wear Allowance tables” from the manufacturer and ASME B30.9.

Not knowing your exact configuration, I will use a standard DOS 1-inch grade 80 x 30’ reach sling as an example. If we just isolated the chain (taking out the master link, coupling links and hooks) you have approximately 106 links of chain. If you determined the minimum thickness to be 0.945” at the bearing points, that is approx. 0.055” of wear from the nominal dimension. 1” grade 80 chain has a pitch length of approx. 3.07” (dimension from the top inner link radius to the lower inner link radius) Let’s assume that wear occurred at both ends of the chain link. The pitch length would increase by 0.11”. Over the entire chain length you could see an increase in reach of approx. 11.66” (0.11” x 106 = 11.66”)

As long as there are no stretched links or deformation this would be acceptable. There is no rejection criteria for reach other than stretch. Wear is not stretch.

There is also no statement in 1910.184 and ASME B30.9 to replace the tag in this event with the correct reach.

A good practice would be to retag the sling with the current reach. The new tag would be considered a repair so your company’s name or initials would have to be on the tag. A load test would not be required. Lastly, lubricating the chain is an excellent way to minimize wear.

Going to LDI? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 20:00

The 27th annual Live Design International (LDI) Show kicks off next week. This year, show organizers are expecting more than 8,000 attendees – representing 72 countries – who work in theater, concert halls, outdoor production venues, houses of worship, theme parks and a variety of other live entertainment venues. They are coming to LDI to see the latest and greatest products in action, get a refresher on industry knowledge, and visit with old friends. LDI expects more than 300 exhibitors providing live demos and many discussion opportunities about lighting, sound, projection and special effects equipment.

You can find CM Entertainment Technology (CM-ET) at Booth #2075. Make sure you check out our new booth design featuring a dedicated training center, speaker array application, motors and rigging products, including:

Plus, check out a circa 1950s CM Lodestar. It’s pretty cool! Our sales, product management and training teams will also be available to address your questions about any of our products.

While You’re Visiting, Get Trained
On Friday & Saturday, attend one of our training demonstrations on the CM Lodestar or the top myths about entertainment motors. Times: 11:00am, 1:30pm & 2:30pm.

Or if you have interest in something bigger, you still have time to register for our Road Hoist Technician Certification Class next week.

We will have a strong representation of associates at our booth this year, including members of our North American Entertainment Technology team, CM-ET Training team, Sales and Customer Service.

Please don’t be a stranger. Tell us what you enjoyed most about LDI this year by posting your comments and photos on our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. We would love to hear from you!

Ask Questions, Share Stories, Get Engaged on Social Media

Tue, 11/04/2014 - 00:00

We decided to shift gears this week and show you a little of what we’ve been up to on social media lately. We have many exciting conversations and interactions happening there every day with our Channel Partners, end users and material handling professionals around the world. All of you reach out to us for different reasons. Here are just a few examples:

  • Some of you have a question you want answered. We received a tweet from a distributor in Mexico who requested special paperwork for border clearance. We got it to him within hours. This was one happy distributor!
  • Others have a cool picture from an exciting concert or event they attended, so we started a collection on Facebook. We love seeing photos from your kid’s sports game or stage performance or while on vacation. If you are lucky enough to get an application story that you can share, we could feature it right here on our blog. Just send it my way!
  • Some of you need expert advice on specific topics. We have addressed many of your questions here. Below are are few of our most popular posts:

Missing Chain Sling ID Tags and who is to Blame
What is the Working Load Limit of a 2 Legged Chain Sling?
The 3 Most Asked Questions from our CM-ET Motor Hoist Schools
Does your Overhead Crane meet OSHA regulations?
Can Lever Tools be Used to Adjust Slings?

  • We also enjoy your tradeshow engagement on Twitter & Facebook and sharing in your fun. Check out these cool beanies from USITT!


Please feel free to reach out to us 24/7 on our social media channels. We are here to promote safety on the job and help you get the answers you need for any of your material handling questions. The first person to engage with us on each of our social media channels below and tell us your favorite CM product and why will receive a CMCO shirt!

(This means 6 winners in total.) We look forward to connecting with you!

Facebook
Twitter (Industrial Products)
Twitter (Entertainment)
LinkedIn
YouTube
Instagram
Google+

Columbus McKinnon Expands Training Offering to Include NCCCO Certification Program

Tue, 10/28/2014 - 19:00

Columbus McKinnon has expanded its comprehensive offering of product and safety training to include NCCCO written and practical certification exams for Overhead Crane Operator Training. The first class will be held November 11-13 at our training center in Tonawanda, N.Y.

Columbus McKinnon’s Overhead Crane Operator Training class is comprised of classroom and hands-on training designed to educate students on OSHA, CMAA, ANSI/ASME B30, and ANSI/ASME P30 regulations as they apply to hoist and crane operators. The class also covers basic rigging safety, proper lifting practices and pre-operational inspection requirements. Now, students can choose to continue their education with NCCCO (National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators) certification. Earning this certification requires students to take a written exam as well as a practical, hands-on examination. To sign up for the course, visit the CMCO Training website.

Continuing education is very important for crane and hoist operators. By offering NCCCO Overhead Crane Operator Certification, we can help ensure students understand how to properly operate a crane and verify through nationally recognized testing that the student is competent in the course material.

As part of the accreditation process, Columbus McKinnon’s test course materials and test site area at the company’s Niagara Training Center were audited and approved by an NCCCO representative. CMCO instructors also successfully completed written and practical exams administered by the commission.

In addition to Overhead Crane Operator Training, Columbus McKinnon offers a comprehensive range of programs and seminars conducted at venues across North America to promote the safe and proper use of rigging and overhead lifting equipment. Courses include topics such as: hoist maintenance, crane and hoist inspection, Crane Institute of America Certification (CIC) for basic and advanced rigging, rigging gear inspection, and load securement.

For a full list of Columbus McKinnon’s training programs, visit our training website.

Columbus McKinnon fully endorses the national certification program offered by the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO).

A Day in the Life of CMCO University

Wed, 10/15/2014 - 23:00

Working for Columbus McKinnon for the last fifteen years, I have had the privilege of working with a lot of great people and products. Wanting to get a bit more hands-on experience with CMCO hoists and rigging products, I recently completed our CMCO University course at our Niagara Training Center and am more motivated than ever about who we are as a company and what we do.

CMCO University is a training that we offer to educate our Channel Partners and Distributors on the fundamentals of our hoist and rigging products. Being on the marketing end of things, I am the messenger of our product and safety messages, so it was nice to have some hands-on time to explore the products that I speak about on a daily basis across our social media channels.

The class was packed with great information presented by various experts on our team. I truly enjoy listening to our product managers and trainers who are so passionate about what they do.

Corporate Trainer, Henry Brozyna, teaching students about rigging.

There were three highlights to my week at CMCO University:

  • Getting to meet our Channel Partners and learn about their daily challenges. I heard many great stories about applications in the field and how our products are used on a daily basis along with excellent application-specific questions.
  • Being inspired by our Product Managers and Trainers, particularly Henry Brozyna. I felt like I received a class in Rigging 101. His passion and enthusiasm for what he teaches really came through. I was impressed (and humbled) to learn how extensive the options are for everything “rigging” and the considerations that need to be made before making a product decision.
  • What stood out most to me was the hands-on product experience, particularly with the 360 degree rotation of our CM Hurricane 360° hand chain hoist. I have seen the video demonstrating its competitive advantages at least 100 times, but using it in person in this drifting application made me a real advocate of its benefits. (Click here to see it in action!) I think that our participants will agree – nothing beats hands-on experiences when it comes to learning.


If you want to learn more about Using Hand-Chain Operated Hoists (Chainfalls) at an Angle, plan to join our upcoming safety webinar this Friday. I will be hosting our live event and it would be great to meet you there!

Aside from all of the learning that took place, we still had time to see the sights of Buffalo and the Niagara region and get to know our fellow classmates better. CMCO University was a great experience for me and the other attendees and I encourage you and your teams to attend as well. It is a great investment that will pay significant dividends for your business and your own development as a material handling professional.

Is Your Material Handling Equipment Tough Enough for Arctic Environments?

Tue, 10/07/2014 - 19:00

 

With increasing demand for the exploration and production of natural resources in North Dakota, Alaska and other northern regions in the U.S. and Canada, there is a growing need for cranes and lifting equipment that can withstand exposure to ultra-cold temperatures. When selecting and specifying these products, careful consideration must be given to site conditions that could affect the safety and use of these heavy-duty lifting devices.

Choosing the correct hoists, cranes or rigging products for an application is always critically important due to the inherent risks involved in overhead lifting. If specified incorrectly, the potential for costly equipment damage, personal injury and lost productivity resulting from failure of overhead lifting equipment can be very significant. While reputable manufacturers of lifting equipment utilize sound engineering, quality materials and have safety factors designed into their equipment, it is important to note that most manufacturers’ standard capacity ratings and duty classes do not take into account the impact that extreme cold temperatures can have on structural steel and other construction materials. This fact is borne out in a variety of industry standards.

Some of these include:

  • ASME (The American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME HST-2-1999 Performance Standard for Hand Chain Manually Operated Chain Hoists states “The hoists and trolleys covered by this Standard are intended for industrial use in ambient temperatures from 0° F (-18° C) to 130° F (54° C).”
  • ASME HST-1-1999 Performance Standard for Electric Chain Hoists and ASME HST-4 Performance Standard for Overhead Electric Wire Rope Hoists both state “hoist equipment is designed to operate in ambient temperatures between 0° F (-18° C) and 104° F (40° C).”
  • DNV Standard for Certification No. 2.22 Lifting Appliances, June 2013 states that for shipboard/industrial cranes (including derrick crane, gantry crane, overhead traveling crane, knuckle boom cranes) if not otherwise specified a design temperature of -10° C (14° F) shall be applied. This is a reference temperature to be used as a criterion for the selection of steel grades.
  • ASME B30.20 Below the Hook Lifting Devices states that additional considerations need to be taken if the working temperature is outside the range of -4 degrees C to 66 degrees C. It suggests that engineers either de-rate the capacity or use steel that is better suited for low temperature service.

The Impact of Cold on Steel and other Construction Materials
These and other standards reinforce the point that “standard” lifting equipment may not be suitable for use in extreme cold. The temperature limitations set forth in these documents may vary slightly from one standard to another, but they all recognize that temperature can negatively affect the safe working capacity of lifting equipment.

Cold temperatures can adversely affect the tensile toughness of many commonly used materials. Tensile toughness is a measure of a material’s brittleness or ductility. Ductile materials can absorb a significant amount of impact energy before fracturing, resulting in deformations (bending) that can alert the operator to an overload situation before a failure occurs. Brittle materials, on the other hand, can shatter on impact. Many materials experience a shift from ductile to brittle if the temperature drops below a certain point. The temperature at which this shift occurs is commonly known as the “ductile-to-brittle-transition” temperature (DBTT). Any brittle failure will be catastrophic and the failure will not necessarily be predictable. It can occur from a random impact, dynamic loading or can propagate out of a stress riser such as a crack or nick.

The Effect of Cold on Other Components
In addition to the effects of cold on steel and other construction materials, we must also consider the suitability of items such as motors, control components, hydraulic fluids, gear box lubricants and welding in these environments. It is important to consider the minimum ambient temperatures that may be present in the location that the hoist, crane or rigging will be used. Cold can cause some oil to become so thick that it cannot be pumped or be relied on as a “splash lubricant”. Grease can become stiff and solidify, causing grease-lubricated rotating parts to seize up.

Ensure Safety when Selecting Lifting Equipment for these Environments
Reading and understanding applicable safety standards and consulting with experienced and reputable equipment manufacturers are two important steps in ensuring operator and facility safety when selecting hoists, cranes and rigging equipment for cold temperature applications.

  • Columbus McKinnon offers cranes, hoists, trolleys and rigging hardware designed and manufactured to order in North America, rather than being mass produced and warehoused. Many of these products lend themselves to modification and substitution of materials, allowing the equipment to be tailored to a specific application. Our Application Engineers are available to work with customers to determine the correct equipment, special componentry and any required design modifications based on a customer’s operating environment, capacity, and service requirements.
  •  Chester Hoist and Yale Cable King hoists, trolleys and crane components can be offered with special cold temperature steels, heated control enclosures, gear box heaters, artic-duty motors, low-temperature lubricants, special material certification (Charpy’s V- Notch ), material traceability reports, NDT of load bearing welds, and certificate of suitability for arctic duty (includes minimum temperature rating).
  •  CM DNV Shackles and DNV Master Sub- Assemblies are certified to meet DNV standards for Offshore Container Specifications and comply with DNV Lifting Appliances Requirements. These products also exceed Charpy’s V-notch impact strength of 42 Joules at -20°C (31 ft-lb at -4°F) as per DNV 2.7-1.

Working with Columbus McKinnon Application Engineers to address your low-temperature equipment needs, along with adhering to proper maintenance procedures and operator training, should allow for safe and uninterrupted operation of hoists and cranes even during periods of extreme cold. Be sure to take into consideration the specific stresses that cold-temperatures put on heavy-duty lifting products to keep your workers safe and prevent dangerous accidents on your worksites.

Resources for Rigging Safety at your Fingertips

Fri, 09/26/2014 - 23:00

Many of you work with chain and rigging equipment every day; that’s why Columbus McKinnon works hard to promote the safe and proper use of all rigging products regardless of industry or application. Relying on 139 years of experience in the material handling industry, we’re continually striving to expand and improve our comprehensive offering of rigging training and product resources to help you do your job efficiently and safely. These tools are easy to access and available to you whenever you need them, whether you’re in the office or out in the field.

The Ultimate Rigging Resource
Rigging equipment end-users need information on the proper selection, use and care of rigging products, as well as insight on application and industry requirements. We took all of this information and combined it into one world-class resource – the CM Chain and Rigging Attachments Catalog.

This catalog was a major collaborative effort between our product, application, industry and training teams with feedback from a number of our Channel Partners and end users. It’s more than just a product catalog; it’s the ultimate rigging resource.

To order copies of our new Chain and Rigging Attachments Catalog, fill out our online form or contact CMCO customer service at 1-800-888-0985. You can also download a copy of the new catalog on our website.

Free Safety Webinars
Since their inception in early 2014, our monthly safety webinars have been a tremendous success. These webinars are not sales pitches. These 1/2 hour educational webinars cover safety best practices that you can use everyday. From pre-operational hoist inspection to determining the center of gravity when rigging a load, these free webinars have something for everyone.

Some of our most popular rigging safety webinars include:

If you ever miss one, don’t worry they’re recorded and available online on our YouTube Channel.

Classroom & Hands-On Safety Training

Columbus McKinnon offers classroom and hands-on rigging training from basic to advanced. Our team of full-time instructors are material handling product and safety professionals with more than 100 years of combined experience in the industry. Like our safety webinars, these courses are not sales pitches; they are intense learning experiences that leave attendees with the knowledge and experience they need to safely select, use, inspect and repair overhead cranes, hoists and rigging equipment on a day-to-day basis.

Visit us at www.cmworks.com/training for more information and a complete training schedule.

In-Stock Guarantee (ISG)
In addition to training, we also work hard to ensure our rigging products get to you fast, so you have them when you need them. With that in mind, we are continually expanding our In-Stock Guarantee to ensure shipment of our most popular hoists, chain and rigging products in three days or less. Currently more than 275 products are available through our In-Stock Guarantee.

Product Improvements
We have also made a number of significant product improvements to our rigging portfolio. For example, our shackles now have enhanced markings as well as a new pin design for increased operator safety. We have also expanded our selection of dual-rated rigging products to help customers reduce and better manage their inventory.

Professional riggers, maintenance workers, plant engineers and safety specialists rely on us for knowledge and expertise on material handling products and use – and we hope you do too, using the variety of resources made available to you by Columbus McKinnon.

This article was originally published on June 6, 2013 and was updated with new content on September 26, 2014.

Can Lever Tools be Used to Adjust Slings?

Thu, 09/18/2014 - 00:00

Richard, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor and recent safety webinar attendee, asks: 

“Is it acceptable to use lever tools to shorten or lengthen slings? Are there any concerns of locking up the lever tool brake?”

 

Peter Cooke, CMCO Training Manager and Safety Webinar presenter, answers:
Your first step is to go to the manufacturer to make sure the lever tool is designed for hoisting.  If the lever tool can be used for hoisting, then you need to pre-plan the lift. To do this, you need to know the share of load and go through the calculations to determine the center of gravity. From there you will be able to size your tensions and choose the right lever tool for the application.

To learn more about rigging using lever tools, we suggest you watch our safety webinar on this topic here.

Locking Up a Lever Tool Brake
In general, lever tools are defined by the type of brake they use:

  • Weston-Type, that utilizes friction discs and a ratchet and pawl
  • Ratchet & Pawl, that is a more archaic design similar to an old car jack.

To avoid locking up the hoist, we recommend a lever tool with a Weston-type brake for hoisting applications. These tools rely on friction and provide a smoother operation. To use the Weston-type brake tool you will need to release the load on the brake before removing the load. When the load is a few inches from the ground, switch the hoist to unload and release the tension by operating the handle. This will prevent the hoist from locking. If this is not an option, then you will need to use a ratchet-and-pawl-type lever tool to prevent the hoist from locking when the tension is removed.

Want to learn more about properly rigging and lifting a load? Watch our August Safety Webinar entitled “Determining the Center of Gravity.”

Can Lever Tools be Used to Adjust Slings? Are there any concerns or locking up the lever tool brake?

Mon, 09/15/2014 - 19:05

Yes, go the manufacturer to make sure that the LT is designed for hoisting.

Yes, you need to preplan the lift. You need to share of load so that ou

Rigging with lever tools (go through example

Are we concerned with the lever tool locking up.

You want to make sure that the lever tool you are using is designed for hoisting.

To learn more about Rigging with Lever Tools, watch our safety webinar specific to this topic here.

Look for us at the CVSA Annual Conference in Buffalo, NY, September 14-17

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 18:00

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) will be hosting a conference and exhibition in Buffalo, New York from September 14-17 at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center.   The CVSA is an international not-for-profit organization comprised of local, state, provincial, territorial and federal motor carrier safety officials and industry representatives from the United States, Canada and Mexico. Their mission is to promote commercial motor vehicle safety and security by providing leadership to enforcement, industry and policy makers.

Stop by Booth #12 to see some of our featured products:

Everyone who stops by our Booth #12 and drops off their business card will automatically be entered into a drawing to win a 3/4 ton Bandit hoist. Henry Brozyna, CMCO Corporate Trainer, will also be at the booth to answer any questions you may have.

Interested in attending? You can register here. We hope to see you there!

Does your Overhead Crane Meet OSHA Regulations?

Tue, 09/02/2014 - 20:00

Jason, an Assistant Manager with one of our Channel Partners, asks:

“I received a call from a customer for whom I had conducted an inspection. The customer stated they received an OSHA reprimand for not having monthly inspections on their cranes. They have 2 top-running bridge underhung trolley-type cranes. OSHA referenced 1910.179 J2IV and 1910.179 B1 as the violations.

In the book I have, 1910.179 B1 states that ‘this section applies to overhead and gantry cranes, including semi gantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, and the others having the same fundamental characteristics. These cranes are grouped together because they all have trolleys and similar travel characteristics.’

Are the references for the reprimand accurate?”

Tom answers:

Some confusion exists among crane and hoist owners, users and service providers regarding crane configurations and the application of Federal OSHA 1910.179 regulations. Some of this confusion may be caused by the first definition in 1910.179 – (a)(1):A “crane” is a machine for lifting and lowering a load and moving it horizontally…”  Because all overhead crane configurations fit this definition to one degree or another, we tend to lump them together and assume that all are subject to these regulations.  This is not the case. I wrote an article on the subject entitled “Does OSHA 1910.179 apply?” To read the full article, go here.

A second resource I want to share with you consists of two OSHA interpretations:

Interpretation #1: Click here
Interpretation #2: Click here

Each interpretation makes it quite clear that OSHA 1910.179 does not apply to the crane types you describe. For OSHA to prevail on a General Duty Clause, which they have not cited, they would have to prove or establish risk of serious injury or death. If the operators are doing proper daily pre-operational inspections, or even inspections once per month, they are covered. These “Frequent Inspections” do not have to be documented. (ASME B30.17 & B30.16.)

ASME B30.16 covers the underhung hoist and the “hoist chains” cited in 1910.179(j)(iv). In short, OSHA doesn’t apply.

Below are some additional resources related to this topic:

Disclaimer:
This blog post is Tom Reardon’s opinion of the interpretation of the relevant sections of OSHA. The reader should seek a legal opinion.

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