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CMCO Live

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the latest material handling developments from Columbus McKinnon
Updated: 2 hours 29 min ago

Pfaff-silberblau Products Perform in “The Miracle of Bern”

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 01:00
Columbus McKinnon recently supplied Pfaff-silberblau brand products for a new musical venue in Hamburg, Germany. Stage Entertainment constructed the ultra-modern performance venue, “Theater an der Elbe,” capable of holding more than 1,800 spectators for the production of “The Miracle of Bern.” Stage Entertainment commissioned Columbus McKinnon Engineered Products GmbH, based in Kissing, for the design, […]

In-Depth Alloy Chain Sling Inspection Part 3: Wear and Corrosion

Fri, 05/15/2015 - 01:00
This article is Part 3 of a 6-part blog series that will cover what professional riggers should consider when performing an in-depth alloy chain sling inspection. Today, we’ll discuss wear and corrosion. When used in rigorous material handling applications, chain can easily become worn or corroded. It is important to inspect chain for defects on […]

Understanding the Difference between Chain Grades and How They’re Used

Fri, 05/08/2015 - 01:00
Chain has been around for over a thousand years. It is one of the most versatile and reliable ways to lift, tension and tie down materials in a variety of applications. In the past, people would use any type of chain to lift something, tie down a load or tow a vehicle. Proper inspection, safety […]

#rigsafe: Promoting Safe Rigging in the Entertainment Industry

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 17:39
On Friday, April 24th we celebrated #RigSafe day, an initiative started by the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT) to promote safe rigging in the entertainment industry. USITT asked companies to join the initiative by sharing rigging safety tips on social media under the hashtag #rigsafe. Columbus McKinnon participated in the event, tweeting our […]

Unique Uses for CM Industrial Rigging Equipment

Fri, 04/17/2015 - 01:00
As a manufacturing and engineering company, Columbus McKinnon places high value in STEM education – education encouraging students to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. But, in recent years, STEM education has evolved into STEAM education, which aims to connect art to these areas of study to demonstrate how industrial products can contribute […]

In-Depth Alloy Chain Sling Inspection Part 2: Nicks and Gouges

Fri, 04/10/2015 - 23:00
This article is Part 2 of a 6-part blog series that will cover what professional riggers should consider when performing an in-depth alloy chain sling inspection. Today, we’ll discuss nicks and gouges. When chain is used to lift, pull or secure materials, the outside surface of the links can come in contact with foreign objects […]

Get Genuine Columbus McKinnon Hoist Parts with the New Parts Star Program

Wed, 04/01/2015 - 23:00
Ordering replacement parts for CM, Yale and Shaw-Box brand electric chain and wire rope hoists is easier, faster and more economical than ever with Parts Star™ by Columbus McKinnon. The Parts Star™ replacement parts program ensures customers that they’re getting authentic Columbus McKinnon parts — the parts designed to fit the hoist’s exact specifications, maintain warranty […]

We Are Where You Are: Columbus McKinnon Opens New Modern Warehouse in Houston

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 23:00
As some competitors are closing and consolidating their distribution centers, Columbus McKinnon continues to invest in its network of warehouse facilities in North America. We’ve worked hard to strategically position our facilities across the country to align ourselves with the critical needs of our customers – one of which is fast delivery of our products. […]

Do You Need to Load Test When You Replace the Wire Rope in an Underhung Hoist?

Sat, 03/14/2015 - 00:00
Richard, a recent safety webinar attendee, asks: “Do you need to load test when you replace the wire rope in an underhung hoist?” Peter Cooke, CMCO Training Manager and Safety Webinar presenter, answers: The replacement of wire rope or chain for underhung hoists is specifically excluded from load test requirements. The wire rope should have already […]

Columbus McKinnon Products and Services on Display at Tradeshows

Sat, 03/07/2015 - 02:00
Trade shows are a great way for us to meet Channel Partners and end users, and to showcase our latest products and services. We’re always excited to connect with business associates and make new friends. Representatives from our Columbus McKinnon de Mexico and Duff-Norton facilities participated in Expo-Manufactura, a trade show held recently in Monterrey City, […]

Customer Questions Acceleration Time on Variable Frequency Drives

Fri, 02/27/2015 - 02:00

Tom, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor and recent safety webinar attendee, asked the following question on variable frequency drives:

3-step infinitely variable control is 1st detent slow speed, 2nd detent HOLD, 3rd detent acceleration. If the application absolutely requires less than 2.0 second acceleration (Lodestar) can anything be done to accommodate?

Chris Zgoda, Corporate Trainer and webinar presenter, answers:

Thank you for your question. When the power is on and applied to the inverter, you can access the “U” parameters. The “U” parameters are the monitor parameters that allow the user to see what is happening. Too low of an acceleration time could present the following two issues:

  1. It could pull too much voltage off the DC Bus too quickly and cause a Uv (Under Voltage) fault.  Viewing the “U” parameter that monitors the DC Bus voltage you will see the DC Bus has approximately 340 Volts on it for a 230V hoist.  With an UP run button press you will note the voltage drops significantly at the first button press. With too quick of a ramp-up time, the voltage will drop even more causing an Under Voltage.
  2. Another potential fault is an Oc fault (Over Current) fault, meaning the inrush current that energizes the motor stator. Generally, the inrush current is about 150% of full load amps. The faster you take that motor from 0 RPM to 1725 RPM, the more current “energy” it will need.  So you could have a huge inrush current, especially if you have a heavy load on the hook, which may cause the drive to fault out, too.  You can also monitor the output current from the drive in the “U” parameter.

I might also note that the acceleration times are based on the full scale frequency of operation,  meaning an acceleration time of 5 seconds is from 0 to 60 Hz. If you press the pendant button for the 1st speed, it would not take 5 seconds to reach 6 Hz. It would be approx. 0.5 seconds.

Always follow factory service procedures when making adjustments to products.

For additional information, check out our Variable Frequency Drives Safety Webinar.

OSHA update: Facts about Current Sling Regulations

Fri, 02/20/2015 - 02:00

February 19, 2015  Today, we are posting updates to this blog article originally posted in 2011. This article continues to be one of our most visited, and we feel it our duty to keep this very important safety information up to date.

 
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has the following regulations for slings:

  • 1910.184 (general industry)
  • 1915.122
  • 1915.113
  • 1915.118 (for shipyard employment)
  • 1926.251 (construction)

Effective June 8, 2011, all slings, chain, synthetic & wire rope, are required to have identification tags/labels permanently attached to them. This regulation applies to slings sold and used in the United States.

Historically, companies did not require wire rope slings to have permanently affixed identification tags/labels on them; it was not required per OSHA 1910.184. This has since changed. Tags/labels are now required.

Also, original load capacity tables found in the OSHA standards were based on information found in ASME B30.9 dating back to 1971.  New tables reflect the current industry standards for working load limits for slings, chain, and synthetic or wire rope.

Changes include:

  • All load charts for slings have been updated to current industry standards.
  • All slings, regardless if made of chain, wire rope or synthetic, must be marked with a tag/label. Now only properly tagged/labeled slings can be used.
  • Slings with detached tags/labels must be removed from service until new tags/labels can be permanently reattached.

To view the OSHA changes made in 2011 in its entirety or to download a copy go to: http://www.osha.gov/FedReg_osha_pdf/FED20110608.pdf

For information on Rigging training, please click here.

In-Depth Alloy Chain Sling Inspection Part 1: Twisting and Bending

Fri, 02/13/2015 - 23:00

This article is Part 1 of a 6-part blog series that will cover what professional riggers should consider when performing an in-depth alloy chain sling inspection. Today, we’ll discuss the effect of twisting and bending.

Consider that chain is evaluated by applying loads in a pure tensile link end-to-link-end fashion and rated accordingly. Rigging chain around edges or corners alters the normal loading pattern significantly. A lack of proper padding or consideration of the D/d ratio (see above) for chain can result in twisted and bent links. Once a chain is twisted or bent it will alter inner link stresses which can result in failure. For this reason all chain containing twisted or bent links must be removed from service immediately.

National Association of Chain Manufacturers (NACM), representing domestic manufacturers of welded and weldless chain since 1933, has conducted D/d testing on alloy chain. As a result of this testing, the NACM came out with the chart below which shows reductions in working load limits based on D/d ratio of alloy chain rigged around an edge or  a corner. Consult the manufacturer for any D/d below 2. The latest revision ASME B30.9 2014 released for sale this month has adopted this chart into the new standard.

Using proper sling protection, following the D/d capacity reductions and exercising proper rigging practices will eliminate damage to your alloy chain slings.

To learn more, view our Chain Sling Inspection Safety Webinar.
Want to get trained? Check out our Qualified Rigger 3 day Workshop.

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